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Neurology


Answer 2
  1. MCI-amnestic type. There is objective evidence in this patient for an isolated memory deficit without significant functional or behavioral impairment, cerebrovascular lesions, or hydrocephalus. In the vast majority of cases, amnestic MCI reflects a transitional state between the cognitive continuum from normal aging to mild AD. NPH is a less common disorder that causes abnormal dilation of ventricles and results in a syndrome that includes progressive gait disorder, urinary incontinence, and dementia.

    SUGGESTED READINGS
    1.
     Kawas CH. Clinical practice. Early Alzheimer’s disease. N Engl J Med 2003;349:1056-63.

    2. Mendez MF, Cummings JL. Dementia: a clinical approach. 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Butterworth-Heinemann; 2003.

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