Turner White CommunicationsAbout TWCSubscribeContact TWCHomeSearch
Hospital PhysicianJCOMSMPBRMsCart
Current Contents
Past Issue Archives
Interactive:
Self-Assessment Questions
Review of
Clinical Signs
Clinical Review
Quiz
Pediatric Rounds
Resident Grand Rounds
Article Archives
Case Reports
Clinical Practice
Exams
Pediatric Rounds
Resident Grand Rounds
Review of
Clinical Signs

Guide to Reading
Hospital Physician
Editorial Board
Information for Authors

Reprints, Permissions, & Copyright
Site Map
Self-Assessment Questions

Emergency Medicine


Answer 1
  1. In children younger than 10 years, the narrowest portion of the airway is below the vocal cords. The pediatric airway differs from the adult airway in many respects. The airway of a pediatric patient is much smaller than that of an adult. Infants have a relatively large and floppy epiglottis, and children have large tongue relative to the oropharynx. The vocal cords have a lower attachment anteriorly, not a higher attachment. In children younger than 10 years, the narrowest portion of the airway is below the vocal cords at the level of the cricoid cartilage. Endotracheal tube size should, therefore, be selected based on the size of cricoid ring rather than the glottic opening.

Click here to return to the questions

 

Hospital Physician     JCOM     Seminars in Medical Practice
Hospital Physician Board Review Manuals
About TWC    Subscribe    Contact TWC    Home    Search   Site Map

Copyright © 2009, Turner White Communications
Updated 1/04/08 • kkj